The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) tax-exempt educational membership society open to all who are interested in learning more about the psychology of Carl Gustav Jung.

Our programs exist primarily of lectures, workshops, courses, book explorations, groups, and Evenings With invited speakers. 

Our facility houses our office, meeting space, and small but excellent lending library, which is available to members.


We are happy to announce that this Fall we will have a completely redesigned website. Some of the new user friendly features will be:

  • New modern website look and feel with user friendly navigation
  • Private membership pages that will allow for managing your profile and allow you to renew your membership on the spot.
  • Vastly improved Integrated program signup system, online payments, email communications and a complete history of all your purchases.
  • New mobile friendly website
  • Many other new features that will be explained when we go online
 





Become a member or renew your membership here. By becoming a member you get discounted fees for programs as well as other benefits.

 
 
 

Fall 2015 Programs

Purchase your seats here using your credit or debit card.

     
   

Events, Fall, 2015

You may reserve and pay for your events online on this page or call 202-237-8109 during business hours. Have your credit card ready.

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Announcement!

We have wonderful news

for the

Jung Society of Washington:

As of October 1, 2014,

Our new Executive Director

will be

JAMES HOLLIS, PH.D.

Welcome him on
Friday November 14


Institute for Sacred Activism

with
Andrew Harvey

Andrew Harvey

The economic, political, spiritual world crisis that we currently find ourselves in is a call to action. It is an opportunity for us to understand the realities around us and to rally together to do something different. We now have before us the possibility of using this current crisis to empower ourselves, and others, to actually get the planet to work. Embracing an uncertain future, we need to support leaders, who are inspired, courageous and effective to rise up. We need to renew the energy of people who are burnt out and apathetic in institutions and corporations. If we point individuals to an inner compass that renews their passion, there is hope for real solutions and inspired creativity. All that we need is already there, in the currency of people, and it only needs to be tapped into.
http://www.andrewharvey.net


Guild for
Psychological
Studies

For over fifty years, the Guild for Psychological Studies has conducted seminars that bring together the depth psychology of Carl Jung, the Records of the Life of Jesus (Synoptic Gospels), the Hebrew Scriptures, and material drawn from myth, poetry, world religions, and the evolving images of modern culture and science. Using a process based on Socratic inquiry and dialog, seminar participants carefully attend to images and feelings, discover connections between the personal and collective psyche, and often find a new commitment to the deep and unfolding truth that has been called the Self or Soul. Visit http://www.guildsf.org.


Joseph Cambray, PhD

Synchronicity: Nature and Psyche in an Interconnected Universe

Download pdf here

In 1952 C. G. Jung published a paradoxical hypothesis on synchronicity that marked an attempt to expand the western world’s conception of the relationship between nature and the psyche. Jung’s hypothesis sought to break down the polarizing cause-effect assessment of the world and psyche, suggesting that everything is interconnected. Thus, synchronicity is both "a meaningful event" and "an acausal connecting principle." Evaluating the world in this manner opened the door to "exploring the possibility of meaning in chance or random events, deciphering if and when meaning might be present even if outside conscious awareness."

Now, after contextualizing Jung’s work in relation to contemporary scientific advancements such as relativity and quantum theories, Joseph Cambray explores in this book how Jung’s theories, practices, and clinical methods influenced the current field of complexity theory, which works with a paradox similar to Jung’s synchronicity: the importance of symmetry as well as the need to break that symmetry for "emergence" to occur. Finally, Cambray provides his unique contribution to the field by attempting to trace "cultural synchronicities," a reconsideration of historical events in terms of their synchronistic aspects. For example, he examines the emergence of democracy in ancient Greece in order "to find a model of group decision making based on emergentist principles with a synchronistic core."

 



Begins September 8 - Six Tuesdays

Course
ASTROLOGICAL SYNCHRONICITY AND NOETIC ENCOUNTERS WITH THE PSYCHE, Heidi Lindermann and Michael Perry
730 - 9:30 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $150.00, members in adv; $175.00, general, $125.00,
full-time student members and senior members over 65.

A question was posed in our most recent class about the "seemingly arbitrary nature of the symbolism associated with astrology." In answer to this vital question, we will examine astrological symbolism from three major cultural matrices, India, Greece, and Egypt, to demonstrate the premise that this symbolism is not arbitrary but is clearly delineated from culture to culture in music, art, poetry, scripture, etc. These symbols were here before we were born and will continue to transform after we die. As such they are wonderful keys to querying the character and the psyche because they were born of the psyche. The elegance of these symbols is only revealed through deep cultural study. This type of study also sheds light on the meaning-bearing synchronicities of a person's life.

According to principles of Kriya yoga, the most important synchronicity that an individual being will ever experience is the coincidence of the time of his or her birth and the birth itself. This synchronicity makes all other synchronicities and knowledge- bearing encounters possible. An inquiry into the moment of birth is a powerful way to enter into the psyche in order to examine one's own character. This inquiry is made through the study of one's natal chart in conjunction with the meditation practices associated with Kriya yoga.

The initial questions asked by a Kriya yogi are: 1) Do the symbolisms contained in my birth chart bear any resemblance whatsoever to the life I've led? 2) Does the symbolism of my birth chart bear any resemblance to my character as I (and others) perceive it? 3) Is my chart an accurate or inaccurate map of my psyche?

In this class we will continue the study of Kriya yoga and astrology through 1) examining our own individual birth charts, 2) studying the parts of a chart including the 12 houses as they relate to character and psyche; the center of the chart as it relates to psychological neutrality and discrimination; the house cusps as the borders of the psyche; and the chart figure as a whole which symbolizes the circle of uniqueness and individuality.

Heidi Lindemann and Michael Perry are lineage holders in the Kriya yoga tradition (an Indian alchemical tradition) and are authorized to initiate and teach Kriya yoga and its related teachings. The techniques of Kriya yoga involve a psycho-physical means of self-inquiry and are an initiated path to understanding one's own psyche in the context of the macrocosm. The Swami order is one of the oldest, continuous, living initiatory and alchemical systems extant. Heidi and Michael combine their experience to make yogic teachings accessible to western minds by use of comparative mythology, storytelling, astrology, and other symbolic systems. They are regular course leaders at the Jung Society, the Theosophical Society, and have delivered lectures on Samkhyayoga to colleges and seminaries.

Membership Level



Begins September 9 - Five Wednesdays

Book Exploration
ALCHEMY: An Introduction to te Symbolism and the Psychology by M.-L. von Franz, April Barrett
7:30 - 9:30 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $50.00, member; $75.00, general

From the back matter: It was the genius of C.G. Jung to discover in the "holy technique" of alchemy a parallel to the psychological individuation process. This book, by Jung's long-time friend and co-worker, completely demystifies the subject.

Designed as an introduction to Jung;s more detailed studies, and profusely illustrated, here is a lucid and practical account of what the alchemists were really looking for - emotional balance and wholeness.

Once again, Marie-Louise von Franz demonstrates her remarkable gift for translating esoteric, symbolic material into everyday experience. For the images and motifs that so occupied the alchemists were of an archetypal nature, and as such they constantly turn up in modern dreams and drawings.

This is an important book, invaluable for an understanding of dreams and indispensable for anyone interested in relationships and communication . . . , anyone involved with his or her own psychological development . . . .

April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

Membership Level



September 12 -Saturday

Workshop
MIRRORS TO THE SOUL: Dreamwork as a Dialectical Process, Melanie Starr Costello
10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Wesley Seminary, Elderdice Room
Fees: $50.00, members in adv; $75.00, general,

In dreams we put on the likeness of that one universal truer, more eternal man dwelling in the darkness of primordial night . . . ; there he is still the whole, and the whole is in him, indistinguishable from nature and bare of all egohood. -C.G. Jung

This workshop places the contextual and narrative elements of night dreams within the larger framework of the psychology of the Self. As seedbeds for Self-emergence, we compare the phenomenon of dreaming in adulthood with maternal mirroring functions in infancy. We then differentiate defining features of the "personal dream" (tending to day-to-day psychic balance) from those of the "big dream" (addressing universal human dilemmas). An emphasis will be placed upon cosmological, environmental, and theological themes as we celebrate the work of the dream in bridging the psycho-spiritual development of the individual to emerging streams of consciousness in the collective psyche.

5 CEs for Psychologists. This program is sponsored by the Jungian Analysts of Washington Association (JAWA). JAWA is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. JAWA maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Seminar Objectives: At completion of this seminar participants will be able to: 1) outline the construct of the Self as a psycho-somatic unity in Jungian psychology 2) describe at least 4 functions of the Self as the central organizing archetype of the psyche 3) differentiate personal from archetypal content in night dreams 4) elucidate the means by which "personal dreams" promote psychological stability 5) describe the psychological and environmental conditions that typically activate "big dreams" 5) apply imaginal techniques and amplification of symbols as therapeutic tools

Schedule: 10:00-12:30 The mirroring function and the dream experience 12:30-2:00 Lunch 2:00-4:00 A dialectical approach to dreamwork 4:00-4:30 Summary and course evaluation

Readings: C.G. Jung (1969). The Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9,II, Aion. Second edition. Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 3-35. C. G. Jung (1969). The Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Vol. 8, The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche. Second edition. Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 237-297.

Melanie Starr Costello, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist, historian, and Zurich-trained Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C. She earned her doctorate in the History and Literature of Religions from Northwestern University. A former Assistant Professor of History at St. Mary's College of Maryland, Dr. Costello has taught and published on the topics of psychology and religion, mystical spirituality, aging, and clinical practice. Her study of the link between illness and insight, entitled Imagination, Illness and Injury: Jungian Psychology and the Somatic Dimensions of Perception, is published by Routledge press.

Membership Level



Begins September 14 - Five Alternate Mondays

Course
THE ARCHETYPE OF TRAGEDY: Modern Re-tellings of Fairy and Folk Tales in Literature and Film, Julie Bondanza
730 - 9:30 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $125.00, members in adv; $150.00, general, $100.00,
full-time student members and senior members over 65.

This fall's readings and watchings are: The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey, The Red Shoes movie, The Snow Queen by Michael Cunningham, The Secret of Roan Inish - the movie, and The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf by Kathryn Davis.

Julie Bondanza, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, and Washington, as well as for various Jung societies across the country. Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years. Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.

Membership Level


September 19- Saturday


Women's Discussion Group
TOOLS AND TASKS OF THE SECOND HALF OF LIFE, Jennifer Downs
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $5.00, at the door

Informed by the work of Jungian analysts Bruce Baker and Jane Wheelwright on the seven tasks of the second half of life, we will explore how Jung's ideas on the unique tasks of the second half of life can be illuminated by the application of tools based on his theory of type as described in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

To reserve your space, please contact Brenda Freeman at brenda_freeman2002@yahoo.com or 301 919 - 9047.

Jennifer Downs is a registered nurse with over 35 years experience as an acupuncturist and grounded in the healing traditions of both East and West. She is also certified as a Myers-Briggs practitioner and is the founder and director of Pivot Point, an organization that draws on diverse practices to empower people to realize the gifts and capacities of the second half of life.




Begins September 21 - Five Alternate Mondays

Reading Course
MYSTIC HEART, SACRED EARTH, Melanie Starr Costello
7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $125.00, members in adv; $150.00, general, $100.00,
full-time student members and senior members over 65.

Reading works authored by three spiritually gifted writers of the twentieth century, we will investigate diverse mystical spiritualities in their relations with the non-human world. We begin with a work of fiction: Platonist theologian and novelist Charles William's The Place of the Lion, a mystery featuring a sudden melding of spiritual and natural realms. The work will facilitate a discussion of the influence of Platonic philosophy upon the Western psyche as we compare Jung's concept of the archetype to Plato's theory of Forms.

Then moving to a nature-based perspective, we will read the stunningly beautiful "mystical nature diary" of Opal Whiteley, a spiritually gifted child raised in a logging community in early 20th century Oregon. We finish with essays by eco-theologian Thomas Berry, calling us to re-envision humanity's place in evolution -- the process through which the Divine reveals itself. Relevant passages from Jung will be assigned as our inquiry unfolds. For questions regarding course content you may contact Dr. Costello at drmscostello@gmail.com.

Readings: Charles Williams, The Place of the Lion, Regent College Publishing, 2003. Opal Whiteley and Benjamin Hoff, The Singing Creek Where the Willows Grow: The Mystical Nature Diary of Opal Whiteley, Penguin Books, 1986. Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim, Thomas Berry: Selected Writings on the Earth Community, Orbis Books, 2014

Melanie Starr Costello, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist, historian, and Zurich-trained Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C. She earned her doctorate in the History and Literature of Religions from Northwestern University. A former Assistant Professor of History at St. Mary's College of Maryland, Dr. Costello has taught and published on the topics of psychology and religion, mystical spirituality, aging, and clinical practice. Her study of the link between illness and insight, entitled Imagination, Illness and Injury: Jungian Psychology and the Somatic Dimensions of Perception, is published by Routledge press.

Membership Level
 



Begins September 24 - Five Thursdays

Course
NARCISSISM AND SELF REALIZATION: Transcending Toxic Self-Love, Tim Lyons
730 - 9:30 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $150.00, members in adv; $150.00, general, $100.00,
full-time student members and senior members over 65.

But what if I should discover that the least among them all, the poorest of all the beggars, the most impudent of all the offenders, the very fiend himself -- that these are within me, and that I myself stand in need of the alms of my own kindness -- that I myself am the enemy who must be loved -- what then?

-CG Jung, Psychology and Religion: East and West

Narcissism is reflected in the process of all human relationship. It is linked to an inability to see the other as separate and to a lack of self-realization. Narcissism is also an essential component of mirroring in early childhood, which occurs within the symbiotic relationship between mother and child and which is vital to the development of healthy grandiosity and self-esteem. Ideally, this mirrored alternation of inner and outer psychic process allows the mother to metabolize a sufficient amount of anxiety to enable the child to tolerate the growing pains of emerging consciousness and independence. Narcissism in infancy is the very beginning of an evolution of mirroring that develops the axial relationship between the archetypal depths and ego consciousness, leading to unconditional Self- love and Self-realization.

If, however, the parent's own intergenerational narcissistic wound is so great and the mirroring process is so disrupted that the child's anxiety, related to emerging consciousness, is not metabolized, then the child will experience primal trauma provoked by this expulsion from paradise. The toxic self- "love" of the parent cannot allow for the individual otherness of the child, who is expected to grow up to mirror the parents own image. The child is unable to develop and experience his/her own emotions adequately, leading to emotional incest and abuse, codependency, and pathological defenses that are re-patterned into adulthood. In today's culture these narcissistic dynamics are mirrored collectively in the Facebook zeitgeist, in "selfies," in our devastating disregard for the earth's environment, and in wars.

Narcissus was on the edge of differentiating his reflection in the pool when he succumbed to his own bait, fell in, and drowned. We can use the myth's images as a caution. In the course of human events, we will fall in, but we need to learn to swim and to drag ourselves out of the pool, having perhaps survived a near-death experience of the ego. Using different versions of Narcissus and Echo, related myths, case material, and examples from contemporary culture, we will reexamine the dynamics and archetypal patterns of narcissism with the goal of seeing to a greater depth in order to reclaim our primordial wholeness from our reflection in the mirror of today's world.

Tim Lyons, LICSW, is a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist in private practice in Capitol Hill and Silver Spring. He is a regular lecturer and teacher at the Jung Society of Washington and has studied Tibetan Buddhism, Taoism, and yoga for many years. He is also an architect, has written for the Washington Post, and has lectured at the Smithsonian Institution.

Membership Level


September 25 - Friday


An Evening With . . .Barbara Mowat
HELEN LUKE: A Sense of the Sacred
7:30 - 9:00 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $20.00, all

Helen Luke, the founder of Apple Farm, a Jungian contemplative community in Three Rivers, Michigan, has become an important voice among those who would learn how to live a fully conscious life. In her many books and essays, she writes perceptively about myth and symbol in life and in art, focusing often on story and how it can guide us in our inner journey. Not long before her death at the age of 90, A Sense of the Sacred: A Portrait of Helen Luke was filmed over the course of many months at Apple Farm. Contributing to the film are Thomas Moore, Robert Johnson, Sir Laurens van der Post, and the director Peter Brook.

Barbara Mowat worked with Helen for twenty years and is her literary executor. She is Director of Research emerita at the Folger Shakespeare Library, Consulting Editor of Shakespeare Quarterly, and Editor (with Paul Werstine) of the New Folger Library Shakespeare. Her major fields of research interest are Shakespeare's printed texts, his dramatic romances, and his reading practices. She holds an M.A. degree in English literature from the University of Virginia, a Ph.D. in English literature from Auburn University, and Doctorates of Humane Letters from Amherst College, St. Johns University, and Washington College. Before coming to the Folger, she was Hollifield Professor of English Literature at Auburn University and then Dean of the College at Washington College. She has served as President of the Shakespeare Association of America, Chair of the MLA Committee on the New Variorum Shakespeare, and a member of the Advisory Board of the International Shakespeare Conference (Stratford-upon-Avon).

Membership Level


September 26 - Saturday

All-Day Workshop

TRANSFORMING TRAUMA THROUGH MYTH AND IMAGE: From African Village to American Inner City., Dr. Eberhard Riedel, Dr. G. Kwame Scruggs
8:30 am - 5:00 p.m., (lunch on your own noon to 1:30 pm,
George Mason University,
Founders Hall, Room 111, 3351 North Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia
Fees:
$90.00, general; $100.00 for CE inclusion

In recent years much attention has been given to the study and treatment of traumatized individuals in the clinical setting. But what of the communities that suffer monumental social problems in the face of our contemporary global epidemic of collective violence? How might traumatized communities heal the brokenness that trauma imposes upon social and cultural identity? This symposium views collective trauma through the unique lens of Jungian psychological theory and demonstrates how two distinguished Jungian practitioners work toward transformation of trauma outside the bounds of the consulting room.

A.M. Session: On the Art of Social Transformation: A Depth Psychology Perspective Presenter: DR. EBERHARD RIEDEL, Jungian Analyst, Seattle, Washington. Stemming from his extensive work in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dr. Riedel will demonstrate how "purposeful action" energizes communities to overcome the paralysis of trauma and effects long-term change.

P.M. Session: The Message of Myth: Finding Meaning and Healing on the Journey Presenter: DR. G. KWAME SCRUGGS, Founder & Director of Alchemy, Akron, Ohio. Dr. Scruggs will speak of his twenty-year odyssey fostering the development of urban American youth through myth telling. Participants will experience this unique approach through personal engagement with an ancient African myth.

This program is sponsored by The Jungian Analysts of Washington Association (JAWA). JAWA is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. JAWA maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

FOR FULL PROGRAM, SEE: Events Calendar at www.jungiananalysts.org

General or CE Credit


October 3 - Friday

Lecture
BEING CALLED TO CO-HEARANCE: Individuation and the Mythic Dimension, Dennis Patrick Slattery
730 - 9:30 p.m., Wesley Seminary
Fees: $20.00, all

A life of co-herence and co-hearance suggests a dialogue or conversation between various parts of ourselves as they seek an underlying unity in an on-going pilgrimage that C.G. Jung called "a process of individuation." The lecture will entertain those moments in our lives of being called and our possible responses to them: accepting the call, rejecting the call, or ignoring it through "call waiting." It will explore Jung's own encounter with the mythic dimension and his own quandary surrounding his not knowing what myth he himself was living.

Dennis Patrick Slattery, Ph.D. has been teaching for 45 years, the last 21 in the Mythological Studies Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute. He is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of 24 books, including one novel and six volumes of poetry, two with accompanying CDs. He has also published over 200 articles in journals, books, newspapers, magazines, and on-line journals. His most recent books include Bridge Work: Essays on Mythology, Literature and Psychology and Our Daily Breach: Exploring Your Personal Myth Through Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. He offers Riting Personal Myth retreats in the US, Europe, and Ireland, based in part on the works of Joseph Campbell as well as others. dslattery@pacifica.edu; www.dennispslattery.com

 




October 3 - Saturday

Workshop
PLOTTING YOUR PERSONAL STORY: A Writing Retreat, Dennis Patrick Slattery
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Wesley Seminary
Fees:
$50.00, members; 75.00, nonmembers; $40.00, senior and full-time student members

Furthering Friday's lecture, we will use several Writing Meditations from Dr. Slattery's book, Riting Myth, Mythic Writing: Plotting Your Personal Story to burrow a bit deeper into patterns that contour our personal myth. We will not use laptops but rather engage cursive writing in journals to capture the spiralic movement that Jung believed was the geometry that stimulated all psychic development. Bring a journal and your favorite writing instrument for these meditations.

Dennis Patrick Slattery, Ph.D. has been teaching for 45 years, the last 21 in the Mythological Studies Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute. He is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of 24 books, including one novel and six volumes of poetry, two with accompanying CDs. He has also published over 200 articles in journals, books, newspapers, magazines, and on-line journals. His most recent books include Bridge Work: Essays on Mythology, Literature and Psychology and Our Daily Breach: Exploring Your Personal Myth Through Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. He offers Riting Personal Myth retreats in the US, Europe, and Ireland, based in part on the works of Joseph Campbell as well as others. dslattery@pacifica.edu; www.dennispslattery.com

Membership Level
 

Begins October 6 - Eight Tuesdays (October 6, 13, 20, 27, Nov. 3, 10, 24)

Course

DARK SELVES: Shadow Encounters in Personal and Public Life, James Hollis
7:00 - 8:30 p.m., Guy Mason Community Center at Calvert and Wisconsin Aves.
Fees: $150.00, members in adv; $175.00, general, $125.00,
full-time student members and senior members over 65.

For each of us there are energies, motives, agendas that operate outside our conscious control and are sometimes contrary to our professed values. These energies, which Jung collectively identified as the Shadow, might only occasionally be defined as evil, but more often as that which make us uncomfortable with ourselves. Such energies represent an enormous summons to greater consciousness and to the possibility of living more ethically.

his course will define and illustrate the many ways in which the Shadow operates in personal and social life: our daily choice making, our family and business settings, our institutions; it even shapes our views of the nature and purpose of the cosmos.

At the end of the course, we will have some exercises through which each of us will be able to lift some of the personal Shadow out of the hidden world into fuller scrutiny.

James Hollis, Ph. D., is Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington, a Jungian analyst in private practice, and author of fourteen books.

Membership Level



Begins October 10 - Monthly Second Saturdays

Seminar Program

JUNGIAN STUDIES READING SEMINAR: A Two-Year, Certificate-Bearing, Advanced-Studies Program
9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m, Jung Society Library

 

Beginning this fall, eight monthly seminars will be offered, October to May, to read and discuss predominantly classical Jung. Other figures possibly included will link directly to the classical Jungian corpus.

Students will be expected to read at least one volume per month and be prepared to discuss it. No exams or papers are required. CEs and a certificate of completion will be offered.

At the end of two years (sixteen seminars), the student will be presented with a certificate indicating successful participation in the program. Rolling admissions will be possible both for the October and the February seminars.

The cost of the seminar will be $800 per semester, $1600 per year, for a total of $3200 for the two-year program. To receive a certificate, a student will have attended a minimum of twelve seminars, with make-up sessions allowed another year. Seminar size will be held to a maximum of 20.

 Inclusion in this program will depend on successful application, and scholarship funds will be made available. For information about this exciting new program and to request an application form please contact us at leslie@jung.org.



October 16 - Friday


An Evening With . . . Bill Dols
JUST BECAUSE IT DIDN'T HAPPPEN ..., Bill Dols
7:30 - 9:00 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $20.00, members in adv; $25.00, general, $15.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

The author Tim O'Brien has observed that "just because it didn't happen doesn't mean it isn't true." His celebrated Vietnam memoir, The Things They Carried, reflects this truth as found in literature of all kinds and ages including biblical narrative.

This evening is devoted to exploring how ancient as well as contemporary texts can serve as mirrors of our own journeying. It offers a brief opportunity to enter the universe of story, found in prose and poetry, as doorway to more than meaning and understanding but to what Joseph Campbell describes as "the experience of being alive."

We will consider a Jesus story, and one by Kent Haruf, as well as poetry by Denise Levertov, Mary Oliver, and William Stafford.

Bill Dols has served parishes in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina as an Episcopal priest for twenty-five years. While pursuing graduate studies in psychology and biblical studies in Berkeley in the 1980s, he began leading seminars for The Guild For Psychological Studies in San Francisco. After eight years as Director of The Educational Center in St. Louis, he moved to Charlotte where, until his retirement in 2001, he served as Minister of Adult Education at The Myers Park Baptist Church. Bill and Shirley now live in Alexandria, where they tutor public-school first graders, quilt and garden, paint and read. Bill continues to contribute to The Bible Workbench, which he created and edited for twenty years, and on occasion, he leads weekend retreats.

Membership Level


October 17- Saturday


Women's Discussion Group
ONCE UPON A LOSS: A NEW LOOK AT CINDERELLA (Film and Discussion), Annilee Oppenheimer
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $5.00, at the door

Fairy tales have captivated the imaginations of humans around the world for generations. They are symbolic stories that contain universal themes that offer healing insight about dynamics of the psyche. We will view and discuss the film Once Upon a Loss: A New Look at Cinderella, produced and directed by Carolyn Russell Stonewell. Unlike the Disney version of Cinderella, this film shows that this fairy tale is much more than a rags-to-riches story about "getting the prince." Based on the Grimms' version of the fairy tale, this film presents Cinderella as a story that conveys essential wisdom about recovering from loss. Using the film as a springboard for discussion, we will explore what Cinderella tells us about navigating the psychological journey out of despair into a stronger and more authentic sense of self.

To reserve your space, please contact Brenda Freeman at brenda_freeman2002@yahoo.com or 301 919 - 9047.

Annilee Oppenheimer, a retired lawyer, enjoys exploring dreams, poetry, music, archetypal symbolism, storytelling, and active imagination as vehicles to make connections -- both with our deepest selves and with others.


 

October 23- Friday

Workshop
THE ARCHETYPAL PATTERN OF THE WOUNDED HEALER, James Hollis, Ph.D.
1:00 pm – 4.00 p.m., Wesley Seminary, Elderdice Room,
Fees: $75.00, member; $125.00, nonmembers

Note: This is a repeat workshop given last March 2015

Sponsored by The Jungian Analysts of Washington (JAWA)

Exploring the personal and ethical challenges in professional caregiving, this three-hour workshop is designed for caregivers of all kinds, including clinical psychologists, psychotherapists, medical specialists, social workers, nurses, physicians, and clergy.

As C.G. Jung once observed, only the wounded healer can heal. Only the person who has suffered, come to an enlarged consciousness through that suffering, and then relates out of a more assimilated woundedness can have a healing effect.

The highest percentage of persons in the caregiving professions come from troubled backgrounds and may unconsciously be seeking personal healing through their choice of profession. This program examines intra-psychic dynamics commonly found among caregivers and provides tools for participants to identify 1) the psychodynamics active in the choice and practice of their profession and 2) the typical setups for ethical transgression to which the wounded healer is predisposed.

This workshop will combine lecture and discussion.

PRESENTER: James Hollis, Ph.D. is a graduate of the Jung Institute of Zurich, Switzerland, and executive director of the Jung Society of Washington. The author of 14 books, he teaches at the Jung Society of Washington and is a distinguished faculty member of the Saybrook Graduate School in San Francisco.

CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION:

3 CEs in Ethics for Psychologists, Advanced Level 3 NASW Ethics Contact Hours

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

1. Enumerate at least three recurring patterns of perception and behavior expressed by the archetype of the wounded healer. 2. Identify those dynamics, characteristically found in caregivers’ family backgrounds, that provide unconscious motivation in the choice of caregiving as a profession.
3. Describe the psychological risks that befall the wounded healer who lives daily amid the wounds of others.
4. Delineate at least three recurring patterns in the practice of caregiving that place the wounded healer at risk for ethical transgression.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Hollis, James, Creating a Life: Finding Your Individual Path, Inner City Books, Toronto, 2001. Sedgwick, David, The Wounded Healer: Countertransference from a Jungian Perspective, Routledge, New York, 1994.

 

Membership Level
 



Begins October 28 - Six Wednesdays

Course

RELIGIOUS IDEAS IN ALCHEMY, Rosanne Shepler
7:30 - 9:30 p.m., Ju;;ng Society Library
Fees: $150.00, members in adv; $175.00, general, $125.00,
full-time student members and senior members over 65.

In Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Jung tells of recurring dreams with the same theme. He finds himself in an added wing of his house that was unfamiliar to him but that had been there all along. He came to realize that this unknown wing was an aspect of his own personality - of himself. This unconscious piece revealed itself as an interest for the study of medieval alchemy. The year was 1926, and Carl Jung spent the next 30+ years unraveling the mysteries of alchemy and how alchemy is a symbolic representation of the individuation process.

In this six-week course, we will read in Vol. 12 of the Collected Works Part III: "Religions Ideas in Alchemy". Included in this reading are the Basic Concepts of Alchemy, The Psychic Nature of the Alchemical Work, The Work, The Prima Materia, The Lapis-Christ Parallel, and the Alchemical Symbolism in the History of Religion. Please join!

Rosanne Shepler, LPC, LP, received her diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute of New York in 2002. She also holds Master's degrees in Health Education and Counseling. Rosanne is on the curriculum committee and teaching faculty of the New York Institute and is a past President of JAWA. She has a private practice in Vienna, Virginia.

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Begins October 29 - Five Thursdays (Skip Thanksgiving)

Course

JUNG AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS: HOW DID I GET HERE? A Personal Creation Myth, Sondra Geller
7:30 - 9:30 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $125.00, members in adv; $150.00, general, $100.00,
full-time student members and senior members over 65.

We will use Jungian art-therapy techniques and gesture to explore and make sense of the fundamentals of our life's story. How have these fictions influenced our lives? Have we been bound to living them out? Can we free ourselves from stories that no longer serve us?

Through the use of writing, drawing, and gesture, we will explore the possibilities. Jungian active imagination will be important to our process, along with amplification and experiences that will provide opportunities to develop what Jung called the symbolic function of the psyche.

Please take time before the first class to write one or two pages, double spaced (two copies) of how you would describe your creation myth. Allow yourself poetic license. This is your personal story.

The group will be small; the temenos will be carefully observed.

Sondra Geller, MA, ATR-BC, LPC is a Jungian Analyst, a Board Certified Art Therapist, and a Licensed Professional Counselor. She is in private practice in Chevy Chase, Md. She lectures and gives workshops for The George Washington University Art Therapy Master's Program, Philadelphia Jung Institute/PAJA, the Jung Society of Washington, and the C.G. Jung Institute in Kusnacht, Switzerland. Her focus is on Making Art in the Presence of the Analyst, Jung and Aging, Jung and the Creative Process, and Jungian Art Therapy. Sandy was recently guest co-editor of a special issue of Psychological Perspectives, "Aging and Individuation," and she presented a paper entitled "Sparking the Creative in Older Adults" at a Conference by the same name, sponsored by Psychological Perspectives and the Jung Institute of L.A..

Membership Level


November 6 - Friday

Lecture
JAMES HILLMAN AND THE RETURN OF SOUL: Reflections on His Thought and Legacy, Richard Tarnus
7:30 - 9:30 p.m., Wesley Seminary, Elderdice room
Fees: $20.00, all

James Hillman served depth psychology's double task, ever more critical in our time, to affirm "soul" as essential to any true psychology, and to bring psychology out of the consulting room into the world. This task he performed decade after decade with astonishing inventiveness, style, and learning, evident in every sentence he wrote and spoke.

Hillman was full of paradoxes: Wonderfully European, deep-cultured, and multilingual, yet a born American, jazzy, ever improvising, a rebel subverting the old dogmas. He saw through, endlessly, like a postmodern deconstructionist. And yet he saw, vividly, the gods, the spirits, the depths, like an ancient poet. He held an allegiance to the fallen world, yet he risked a large vision. Above all, Hillman championed the imagination in its high rightful place at the center of human reality. And he saw the anima mundi, the soul of the world, in ways no one had seen before.

Join Richard Tarnas for a thoughtful remembrance of James Hillman's extraordinary contribution to our cultural life and psychological reflections.

Richard Tarnas, Ph.D., is a professor of philosophy and cultural history at the Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, where he founded the graduate program in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness. He is the author of The Passion of the Western Mind, a history of the Western world view from the ancient Greek to the postmodern; and Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View, which received the Book of the Year Prize from the Scientific and Medical Network in the UK. Rick frequently lectures abroad as well as at various Jungian institutes and societies throughout the U.S., and has served for six years on the Board of Governors of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco.



November 7 - Saturday

Workshop
THE GODS AT PLAY: Archetypal Powers and Patterns in the Arts, Richard Tarnus
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Wesley Seminary, Elderdice room
Fees: $50.00, members; 75.00, nonmembers; $40.00, senior and full-time student members

There is no place without Gods and no activity that does not enact them. -James Hillman

As ancient poets and modern depth psychologists have long recognized, the arts represent an especially vivid expression of the archetypal principles that inform and inspire the human psyche.

The aim of this workshop is to provide a rich interplay of entertainment and instruction, each enhancing and illuminating the other. The capacity to discern archetypes - the cultivation of what James Hillman called an "archetypal eye," - requires not only thinking but feeling in all ways, through the emotions, the imagination, the aesthetic intuition, the moral sensibility, the relational capacity, the body: one's whole being. Because the arts engage all these dimensions of the human sensibility, we will use representative works of art as windows into the archetypal character of different eras and individuals and into the archetypes themselves.

We'll focus especially on major examples from music and comedy. Music provides perhaps the most profound and direct expression of the archetypal psyche, reaching back to the earliest origins of human culture, capable of touching the depths of our souls. Comedy is ancient as well: the Trickster, whether in the individual psyche, in a tribe or a royal court, or commenting on a presidential campaign, is crucial to the self-regulating and regenerative play of the whole. It is the agent of the unconscious, the marginalized, rebelling against the conventional rulers, speaking the truth from below.

Our approach will be facilitated by the combined lenses of depth psychology and archetypal astrology, which permit an extraordinarily precise focus on the specific archetypal complexes most prominently at work in a given individual, work of art, or cultural era. Video and audio clips of brilliant performances will be played as illustrations for our analyses throughout the day.

Richard Tarnas, Ph.D., is a professor of philosophy and cultural history at the Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, where he founded the graduate program in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness. He is the author of The Passion of the Western Mind, a history of the Western world view from the ancient Greek to the postmodern; and Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View, which received the Book of the Year Prize from the Scientific and Medical Network in the UK. Rick frequently lectures abroad as well as at various Jungian institutes and societies throughout the U.S., and has served for six years on the Board of Governors of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco

Membership Level


November 13 - Friday


An Evening With . . . Annilee Oppenheimer
MUSIC: Medicine for the Soul ..., Annilee Oppenheimer
7:30 - 9:00 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $20.00, members in adv; $25.00, general, $15.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

Music is everywhere. We often hear a background musical soundtrack as we shop in the mall, drive, and socialize in restaurants. The easy accessibility of music can lull us into viewing music as mere entertainment and cause us to trivialize its importance. The ancients, however, understood that music can have a profound effect on our wellbeing. The Greek philosopher Plato believed that music exists for the purpose of creating harmony among the various aspects of ourselves. In this program we will explore how music can be an ally in our path to health and wholeness. We will look at ways we can intentionally use music to access untapped potentialities and enlarge our lives.

Annilee Oppenheimer is a retired lawyer. She enjoys exploring dreams, poetry, music, archetypal symbolism, storytelling. and active imagination as vehicles to make connections -- both with her deepest self and with others. She has been attending programs at the Jung Society of Washington since 1999, and she finds that the Jung Society provides a beautiful container for what the writer Parker J. Palmer calls "a community of solitudes where we can be alone together."

Membership Level

 


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November 20 - Friday

Lecture/Discussion

UNDER SATURN'S SHADOW: The Wounding and Healing of Men, James Hollis
7:00 - 8:30 p.m., Wesley Seminary, Room KG-01, on Massachusetts and Nebraska Avenues
Fees: $20.00, all

Women have courageously examined their roles and the limitations placed upon their souls. Men similarly need to examine the presuppositions and limitations that govern their lives and make them a dangerous, and endangered, species. This program will explore the range of male definitions, the often unconscious relationship to mother and father, and the role that fear plays in men's lives. Only a frank discussion of these secrets breaks the conspiracy of silence that estranges them not only from women but even more from themselves. (This program is as much for women as it is for men). CEs will be offered.

James Hollis, Ph.D., is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C., executive director of the Jung Society of Washington, and author of fourteen books.



November 21- Saturday


Women's Discussion Group
USING ARCHETYPAL ASTROLOGY IN THE REAL WORLD, Janet Kane
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $5.00, at the door

Archetypal astrology deals with the dynamic forces that reside both in the psyche and the physical world and uses the symbols of astrology to connect them. This type of astrology developed from the work of depth psychologist Carl Jung, James Hillman, founder of archetypal psychology and Dane Ruhudyar, the first to apply Jungian psychology to astrology. The practical aspects of archetypal astrology can provide a deep understanding of the people in your life. Janet will use Archetypal Astrology to interpret current events and people on the world stage such as the presidential candidates.

Janet Kane is a professional consulting astrologer and uses archetypes found in literature, myths, fairy tales, and film in her consultations, courses, and workshops. She has taught at Mount Vernon College, The Jung Society of Washington, The Friends Wellspring Conference, and Washington College in Chestertown, MD. She is also the founder of the Wisewoman Forum in Washington, D.C. She publishes a free, on-line newsletter, Mythic Zodiac. You can contact her via her blog at http://www.mythiczodiac.com or contact her at janetkane56@gmail.com

To reserve your space, please contact Brenda Freeman at brenda_freeman2002@yahoo.com or 301 919 - 9047.



tim
December 4 - Friday

Lecture

SHAKESPEARE AND ARCHETYPES, OR HOW SHAKESPEARE BECAME AMERICAN!, Susan Rowlands
7:30 - 9:30 p.m., Wesley Seminary, Elderdice Room, on Massachusetts and Nebraska Avenues
Fees: $20.00, all

Susan Rowland's lecture will explore Shakespeare's pivotal, cultural, and psychological role in founding and funding diverse American identities. In so doing she will reveal similar Shakespearean and Jungian approaches to symbols, gender, and war. If Jung reading Shakespeare can supply his psychological embodying, then so can Shakespeare read Jung as an essentially dramatic attempt to rebalance the modern and American psyche.

Susan Rowland, Ph.D., is Chair of MA Engaged Humanities and the Creative Life at Pacifica Graduate Institute, California, and formerly Professor of English and Jungian Studies at the University of Greenwich, UK. She is author of a number of books on literary theory, gender, and Jung including Jung as a Writer (2005); Jung: A Feminist Revision (2002); C. G. Jung in the Humanities (2010), and The Ecocritical Psyche: Literature, Evolutionary Complexity and Jung (2012). She also researches detective fiction with a book, From Agatha Christie to Ruth Rendell (2001) and NEW in 2015, The Sleuth and the Goddess: Hestia, Artemis, Athena and Aphrodite in Women's Detective Fiction. Currently working on a project on Dionysus, Jung, Hillman, and disciplines, she is also exploring new discourses in the humanities and creativity in post-graduate education in her program. In addition she teaches an online interactive public program on Shakespeare called "Shakespeare in Depth."



tim
December 4 - Friday

Workshop

SHAKESPEARE AND ARCHETYPES, OR HOW SHAKESPEARE BECAME AMERICAN!, Susan Rowlands
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Wesley Seminary, Elderdice Room, on Massachusetts and Nebraska Avenues
Fees: $50.00, members; 75.00, nonmembers; $40.00, senior and full-time student members

Susan Rowland's lecture will explore Shakespeare's pivotal, cultural, and psychological role in founding and funding diverse American identities. In so doing she will reveal similar Shakespearean and Jungian approaches to symbols, gender, and war. If Jung reading Shakespeare can supply his psychological embodying, then so can Shakespeare read Jung as an essentially dramatic attempt to rebalance the modern and American psyche.

Susan Rowland, Ph.D., is Chair of MA Engaged Humanities and the Creative Life at Pacifica Graduate Institute, California, and formerly Professor of English and Jungian Studies at the University of Greenwich, UK. She is author of a number of books on literary theory, gender, and Jung including Jung as a Writer (2005); Jung: A Feminist Revision (2002); C. G. Jung in the Humanities (2010), and The Ecocritical Psyche: Literature, Evolutionary Complexity and Jung (2012). She also researches detective fiction with a book, From Agatha Christie to Ruth Rendell (2001) and NEW in 2015, The Sleuth and the Goddess: Hestia, Artemis, Athena and Aphrodite in Women's Detective Fiction. Currently working on a project on Dionysus, Jung, Hillman, and disciplines, she is also exploring new discourses in the humanities and creativity in post-graduate education in her program. In addition she teaches an online interactive public program on Shakespeare called "Shakespeare in Depth."

Membership Level
 

Webmaster - Steve Kane
srkane@gmail.com


©2015 The Jung Society of Washington
5200 Cathedral Ave, N.W. Washington D.C. 20016

 

 
 


From frequent presenter,
Bud Harris:

We are happy to let you know that at the suggestion of people close to us we are going to enlarge our community. Our goal is to explore new ways to bring fresh and meaningful content to both old friends and new ones. As we continue our journey into our new community we will be exploring Jungian ideas, spirituality, my books, those I've co-authored with my wife, exercises from the workbook and seminars we have developed, exerts from lectures and the series I have done for several years at a local bookstore.

Our exploration will begin with my book SACRED SELFISHNESS. For those of you who have read and valued the book you will have the opportunity to find new ideas and a renewed sense of purpose in what we are presenting. And, you can now share the front matter and chapter one in the book with friends and family (download the free PDFs here.) After our initial opening we will continue every two weeks with the most compelling points in the next chapter and interesting exercises from the SACRED SELFISHNESS WORKBOOK. I will also be looking forward to sharing my new reflections that will come up as I look at this material again and hear from you.

There is, of course, a story behind why I am doing this. As I review my life I am very clear that my myth is to be a Jungian Analyst, a seeker and a healer. Part of this myth is to share what I have learned in a way that may help others in their efforts to find a self that is broader and stronger and a life that is beyond what they could have imagined. In other words I want to share in ways that may help you in your journey of individuation, finding your myth and living into the pattern of a fulfilled life that is inherent in every one of us. This is a journey to fulfill this pattern which is both instinctual and Divine, psychological and spiritual, and yet must also be lived fully.

Just as I am clear about my myth I am also clear the pattern for my life exists but I cannot know it in advance. Oh, how I often wish I could. But, my task from mid-life on has been to remove the blocks that separate me from it, seek to discover it and then live into it. And so, I've come full circle in the story behind this understanding. I want what I have learned and experienced, and what I can still learn and experience, to contribute to the river of life and not to someday simply disappear into the ground.

I would like to give a special invitation to those of you who have subscribed to my newsletter to join us in this new community. At the same time I will continue my newsletter approximately every other month. We will be sharing our new content through Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and a portal through the website of the Center for Spiritual Resources of the Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina.

I also want to give my sincere thanks to all of you for your interest in Jung, my work and for your responses and contributions.