The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) tax-exempt educational membership society open to all who are interested in learning more about the psychology of Carl Gustav Jung.

Our programs exist primarily of lectures, workshops, courses, book explorations, groups, and Evenings With invited speakers. 

Our facility houses our office, meeting space, and small but excellent lending library, which is available to members. 

Would you like to attend events at reduced rates or even free? Inquire about volunteering for the Society. We need help in the office, at events and to do advertisng and marketing. Call 202-237-8109.

NEW ARTICLE BY JEROME BERNSTEIN:

SURVIVING OUR OWN GENIUS IN THE AGE OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: The Western Psyche and the Native-American Psyche





   
 

Fall 2014 Programs

Purchase your seats here using your credit or debit card.


September 5- Friday

SOLD OUT


An Evening With . . . Rosanne Shepler
THE TAVISTOCK LECTURES: An Overview, Rosanne Shepler
7:30 - 9:00 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $20.00, members in adv; $25.00, general, $15.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

The five lectures known as Jung’s Tavistock Lectures comprise the book Analytical Psychology: Its Theory and Practice.  Here’s what reviewers, including Joseph Campbell, had to say about them.

“[T]hese lectures provide an extremely clear, readable, and at times amusing exposition of Jung’s theories.  In them, Jung not only describes his views on the structure of the mind [psyche], giving lucid accounts of his psychological types, of the personal and collective unconscious, and of archetypes, but also explains vividly his techniques of dream analysis, active imagination, and the role played by transference in analytic therapy.”
                     – Charles Rycroft, The New York Review of Books

“[J]ung was a charismatic personality, and this volume bears witness not only to his erudition and his originality but also to is charm and his persuasiveness.” 
                      – The Times Literary Supplement (London)

“This, surely, is the most lucid, simple, and orderly introduction to the basic principles and methods of the Jungian science of the psyche that has yet been offered to the public. 
                     – Joseph Campbell, Book World

Rosanne Shepler, LPC, LP, received her diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute of New York in 2002. She also holds Master's degrees in Health Education and Counseling. Rosanne is on the curriculum committee and teaching faculty of the New York Institute and is a past President of JAWA. She has a private practice in Vienna, Virginia.




Two Swamis
September 9 through October 14 - Six Tuesdays

Course
Venus and Mars: Psychological Urges in Harmony and Dissonance, Heidi Lindemann and Michael Perry
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $150.00, members; $175.00, nonmembers;$125.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

Mars asks us questions like: What do you feel?  What does your gut tell you? What is your first impulse? Venus asks us: What do you think?
What is your aesthetic ideal?  What is your considered plan?


The relationship between Venus and Mars plays out in dissonant and harmonic ways.  When in harmony, these psychological urges manifest as “the urge to merge.”  This was represented from old cultures to modern popular culture – from the image of Ardhanarishvara (half man/woman) in India to Plato’s story of male, female, and neuter beings in the Symposium, to every love story depicted in film or literature.  But Venus/Mars harmony also has a malefic manifestation.  Venus, as the ideal of thought, constructs abstract architectures for more perfect societies, whereas Mars, eager to do something, carries out the Venusian ideal in the form of pogroms and genocides.  In dissonance the forces are experienced as the “battle of the sexes,” or internally simply as the tension between thinking and feeling.  Children often experience it as a maternal sense of fairness and justice (e.g., I love all my children equally) verses paternal reckoning, accountability, and impulse (e.g., this child is successful, that one is not).

We will examine ways in which harmony and the dissonance of Venus and Mars always exists simultaneously and ask ourselves what ideals (Venus) pull us again and again into familiar actions (Mars) despite our longing to break out of the patterns that bind us. 

In the kriya yoga tradition, astrology is an initiated experience that allows one to explore the parameters of their own psyche and their own life experience, rather than having it interpreted by another.  As always, the course will culminate with the participants’ presentations of their own projects synthesizing the materials presented in the class and their meaning to the participants’ own psyche and life.

Heidi Lindemann and Michael Perry a (Swamis Abhipadananda & Jyotir Vakyananda) are lineage holders in the Kriya Yoga tradition, an Indian alchemical tradition, and are authorized to initiate and teach Kriya Yoga and its related teachings.  The techniques of Kriya Yoga involve a psychophysical means of self-inquiry and are an initiated path to understanding one’s own psyche in the context of the macrocosm.  The Swami order is one of the oldest, continuous, living initiatory and alchemical systems extant.  Heidi and Michael combine their experience to make yogic teachings accessible to western minds by use of comparative mythology, storytelling, astrology, and other symbolic systems. They are regular presenters at the Jung Society, Theosophical Society, Kanyakumari Ayurveda & Yoga Wellness Center, and have lectured on Samkhya Yoga to colleges and seminaries in various parts of the United States.  They teach and initiate the techniques of Kriya Yoga on a private basis in Washington, D.C., and regularly perform life-cycle rituals in their role as swamis.



Rosanne SheplerSeptember 10 through October 8 - Five Wednesdays

Course
READING JUNG: ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY, ITS THEORY AND PRACTICE: The Tavistock Lectures, Rosanne Shepler
7:30 pm – 9:30 p.m., The Jung Society Library
Fees: $125.00, member; $150.00, general; $100.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

In 1935, Carl Jung was invited to give five seminars at the Institute of Medical Psychology (Tavistock Clinic), to an audience of psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, medical graduates, and university workers, to give an account of his contribution to psychoanalysis.  In the audience were eminent figures in the field such as Wilfred Bion, Samuel Beckett, and those with a Freudian inclination, who had lively discussions with Jung at the end of each lecture.  Jung spoke with few notes; his lectures covered various topics related to his concepts and theories.  In the first lectures, Jung gives an overview of the nature and structure of the psyche, including the four functions, the personal and objective psyche, and his approaches to the unconscious.  In the latter lectures, Jung presents various aspects of his psychological theory and understanding of dreams and their symbols.  He states that dream analysis is the objective source of information.  Questions from the audience were discussed at the end of each lecture, but these questions became more focused on the issue of the transference, leading Jung to spontaneously change his program rather than finishing his exposition on dream interpretation.  Jung’s tour de force was the last lecture, a spontaneous lecture on the transference and the archetypal projections on the analyst from the patient.  Ten years later, he published his major work on the subject, The Psychology of the Transference, in which he described and emphasized the mutuality of the analytic relationship. Later, in 1968, this text was published under the title Analytical Psychology: Its Theory and Practice; The Tavistock Lectures.

 

Rosanne Shepler, LPC, LP, received her diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute of New York in 2002.  She also holds Master's degrees in Health Education and Counseling.  Rosanne is on the curriculum committee and teaching faculty of the New York Institute and is a past President of JAWA.  She has a private practice in Vienna, Virginia.




John KingFran ZamoreSept. 15, 29, Oct. 13, 27, Nov. 10, 24, Dec 1, 8 - Eight Mondays
Course
EXPLORING OUR LIGHT AND OUR SHADOW: The Practice of our Mind-Body Skills, John King and Fran Zamore
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $150.00, members; $175.00, nonmembers; $125.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

 

Symbols of the self arise in the depth of the body, and they express its materiality every bit as much as the structures of the perceiving consciousness. – C. G. Jung

In our ongoing work toward consciousness, the mind and body are deeply intertwined. This course will explore the many aspects of our self through an intentional focus on the mind-body connection. This course will be didactic and experiential and builds on the work of the Center for Mind-Body Medicine, which has been developing and sharing validated mind-body–medicine techniques around the world for many years (www.cmbm.org). Each week, group members will engage in a mind-body technique and be encouraged to share their experiences. The methods attempted will include: guided imagery, breath work, meditation, movement, autogenics, and expressive art. The exercises will take place in a supportive environment, and no previous experience with these practices is necessary. Our hope is to find a practice, or if we’re experienced, to deepen a practice that integrates the mind-body connection into our daily lives and increases our self-awareness and wellbeing.

John King, MBA, is a long-time student of C.G. Jung, depth psychology, and mind-body practices. He has served as Director of Training at Meridian International Center and has extensive experience facilitating cross-cultural and interpersonal communications groups. John is also a filmmaker and has produced and directed documentaries for private organizations, for PBS, and other television networks.

Fran Zamore, LCSW-C, is a clinical social worker, marriage and family therapist, Reiki Master, and student of energy healing. She has extensive experience working with individuals, couples, and groups as well as facilitating workshops in mind-body skills. She practices in Bethesda, MD.




September 20 - Saturday


WISEWOMAN/CRONES' FORUM: Women's Discussion Group
Discussion on "Threat Response and Irrational Emotions in Current Politics" Beverly Fourier
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $5.00, at the door

This is a timely topic considering the horrific Ukraine plane incident and the continuing violence in Gaza and Israel. 

Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance and feel free to bring a friend. 

Beverly Fourier was born in Adams, Massachusetts, the birthplace of U.S. suffragette Susan B. Anthony. Beverly has an undergraduate degree in languages from Boston University, a graduate degree in Education from Stanford University, and a graduate degree in counseling from the George Washington University. She lived in Tehran, Iran, and Moscow, USSR, as a U.S. Foreign Service spouse. Her blog www.FierceVenus.com is dedicated to all those people in the world who still feel oppressed, and who are not free to express themselves. The Fierce Venus is a woman who has to fight for her rights and speak out against injustice.


 

Julie BondanzaSeptember 22, October 6 & 20, November 3 & 17- Five Alternative Mondays

Course
THE ARCHETYPE OF TRAGEDY: Short Novels From Around the World,
Julie Bondanza

7:30 pm – 9:30 p.m., The Jung Society Library
Fees: $125.00, member; $150.00, general; $100.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

This course continues the study of the archetype of tragedy, although participation in the previous courses is not necessary. We will read the following short novels:

The God of Small Things. By Arundhati Roy. (Indian)
The Death of Ivan Ilyich.  By Leo Tolstoy (Russian)
The Chronicle of a Death Foretold. By Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Columbian)
The Dead  By James Joyce (Irish)
Things Fall Apart. By Chinua Achebe (Nigerian)

Julie Bondanza, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at The C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts.  She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, and Washington, as well as for various Jung Societies across the country.   Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years.  Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.



Julia VickersSeptember 26,- Friday

SOLD OUT

An Evening With . . . Julia Vickers
JUNGIAN ARCHETYPE IN FILM, Julia Vickers
7:30 - 9:00 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $20.00, members in adv; $25.00, general, $15.00, s/s over 65

Why are there certain movies we can watch over and over? Movies talk to us about our culture and about ourselves. Join Julia Vickers, producer of the documentary Jungian Archetype in Film, to discuss classic films that have endured. Wizard of Oz, Frankenstein and film noir, are just a few of the films to be discussed. Enjoy some sneak preview of interviews with noted Jungian analysts Jean Shinoda Bolen and John Beebe who were interviewed for Jungian Archetype in Film.

Julia Vickers is a writer and filmmaker. She has been working in the Washington DC documentary community for over 15 years and has worked for PBS, WDCA and numerous independent documentaries. She is the author of Lou von Salome and The Fourth Fragment.



October 2 through October 30 - Five Thursdays


Course
THE ALCHEMY OF CONSCIOUSNESS IN & OUT OF BODY: An Exploration of Embodiment, Parapsychology, Death and Rebirth, Tim Lyons
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $125.00, members; $150.00, nonmembers; $100.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

Far below I saw the globe of the Earth, bathed in a gloriously blue light. . . . Presumably I too was in my primal form. . . . I felt as though I were floating in space, as though I were safe in the womb of the universe in a tremendous void, but filled with the highest possible feeling of happiness. . . . It is impossible to convey the beauty and intensity of emotion during those visions. They were the most tremendous things I have ever experienced. –C.G. Jung

Being embodied is an experience of feeling finite in the form of the body. To be identified with one’s thoughts, and hence “out of the body” and then manage to enter into an embodied state, moves a person back to his or her true essence. – Nathan Schwartz Salant

It is not coincidence that the first subject of Carl Jung’s collected works was occult phenomena.  This was in clear opposition to Freud’s causality driven worldview.  When Freud told Jung to promise never abandon the sexual theory . . . we must create a dogma of it . . . an unshakeable bulwark . . . against the black tide of mud of occultism, these words “alarmed” Jung and ultimately split his relationship with his mentor.  These so-called occult phenomena involve the concept that consciousness and spirit can exist in as well as outside of the body, not just limited to the biological function of the brain.  As much as these ideas terrified Freud, they, thankfully, helped propel Jung into a healing crisis, his confrontation with the unconscious, with the result that he formulated some of the most revolutionary and practical psychological advances in modern times.  In the process, Jung struggled to understand issues of science and faith, death and rebirth, precognition and karma.  He also found that it was essential to stay grounded and embodied enough so as not to be “torn to pieces” by the intense “emotions wrought up” by this experience.  Jung’s self-experiment provides  a model for the animation of the individuation process.  Violence, abuse, emotional incest, war, medical procedures, near-death experiences, shock, dissociate, and displace our consciousness and tend to drive it out of body.  Even our good qualities and talents can send us out of body through inflation.  Especially intense and intrusive energy can cause states of possession that occupy the body stubbornly and dominate and alter perceptions.  In response to the stress, compensatory defense mechanisms, addictions, and prescribed medications can fill the gap left by the displaced psyche and prevent us from re-inhabiting our bodies fully in an attempt to protect us.  Paradoxically, the greater the displacement and dissociation, the greater the repetition of the patterns that synergize with the wounding.            

If we can become mindfully aware of this displacement, we can turn the reverberating effects of trauma into a healing crisis. Then we can build our psychic and bodily immune response to these revisited patterns and eventually dissolve the imprints in and outside the body enough so that we can re-occupy our bodies safely and thrive.  Paradoxically, to do this, we often need to go “out of body” into a world that can transcend time and space, that often forces an encounter with our mortality in processes more easily identified with the occult or shamanism.  These “non-ordinary states” encourage synchronistic occurrences that can help our selves associate consciously to our reactivity and the realization that these seemingly external triggers and patterns are actually self- generated.  With this increased orbit of conscious psychic existence we can expand our individuation energy’s connectivity and create opportunities to get clarity about our role and meaning in our lives, fear death less, and live more in the present.            

In this course we will examine the alchemical psycho-dynamics of embodiment, attachment, displacement, the confusion of simultaneous mixed in and out of body states, and collective and religious influences on these states.  We will explore Jung’s struggle with questions about the transformation of psychic energy when the body dies, astral experiences, precognition, and reincarnation, as well as Nathan Schwartz Salant’s work on fusion states.

Tim Lyons, LICSW, is a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist in private practice on Capitol Hill and Silver Spring; he has studied Eastern religions and yoga for many years. He has completed post-graduate studies at the Philadelphia Jung Seminar and has given lectures and classes on Jung and Eastern Spirituality and inner work at the Jung Society of Washington. He is also an architect, has written for the Washington Post, and has lectured at the Smithsonian Institution.



J. Pitman McGeehe
October 17- Friday

Lecture
THE PARADOX OF LOVE: A Reflection on What Jung Called Life's Greatest Mystery, J. Pittman McGehee
7:30 pm – 9:00 pm.
 Institute for Spiritual Development, 5429 Sherier Place, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016.
Fees: $20.00, all

This lecture will take participants deep into a discovery of the nature of love, exploring its diverse faces, its history, and defining its opposite.  Based on Dr. McGehee's book, The Paradox of Love, we will address both the healing and wounding nature of love, the greatest of contradictions.  It is said that one can tell the sophisti-cation of a culture by the number of words it has for a concept.  Eskimos have 50 words for snow; Sanskrit has 96 words for love.  In English we have one word for love.  This evening we will reflect on the three primary Greek words for love: Eros, Philia, and Agape.  We will address the cultural, theological, and psychological aspects of what Jung called the incalculable paradoxes of love.

J. Pittman McGehee, D.D., is Episcopal Priest and Diplomate Jungian Analyst.  For 12 years he was Dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Houston, which he left to train as an analyst, receiving his diploma in 1996.  He is adjunct faculty at the University of Houston, Saybrook University, and The C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich.  He has authored five books and lectures frequently in the fields of psychology and religion.                      



J. Pitman McGeehe
October 18- Saturday

Workshop
THE FOUR ARCHETYPES OF LOVE, J. Pittman McGehee
10:00 a.m. – 4:00 pm.
Venue to be announced
Fees: $50.00, members; $75.00, general; $40.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

This workshop will address the four primary archetypes of love: Mother, Father, Other, and Self.  Using lecture, discussion, and experiential exercises, it will address the psychological implications of love through these primary relationships. The morning is lecture with ample time for questions and discussion on both evening and morning lectures.  The afternoon will be a meditative time with an experiential exercise of mandala construction, based on one’s own experience with these various kinds of love.

J. Pittman McGehee, D.D., is Episcopal Priest and Diplomate Jungian Analyst.  For 12 years he was Dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Houston, which he left to train as an analyst, receiving his diploma in 1996.  He is adjunct faculty at the University of Houston, Saybrook University, and The C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich.  He has authored five books and lectures frequently in the fields of psychology and religion.                      



Bill DolsOctober 21 through December 2 - Six Tuesdays

SOLD OUT

Course
TREASURES OF DARKNESS: Riches Hidden in Secret Places, Bill Dols
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $125.00, members; $150.00, nonmembers; $100.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

A voice from the back door as the sun goes down: “Come in now. It’s getting dark.”  These six weeks are an invitation to, instead, come out from the light into the dark.  The search is for the treasures and riches that the prophet Isaiah says are hidden in the dark and secret places of our lives.  Each will search in her/his own way and find their unique treasure there.  The path will include poetry by people like Gwendolyn Brooks, Maya Angelou, Theodore Roethke, and Rainer Maria Rilke; writings of Thomas Berry, Elie Wiesel, and Pema Chodron; words of the Hebrew prophets and Jesus of Nazareth.  We will reflect on a short play by Robert Anderson and look between the lines of a current Hollywood film; explore the art of Edward Hopper as we brave the shadows within, between, and around us.  It is the integration of such darkness that C.G. Jung described as the “apprentice-piece” of becoming whole. 

Bill Dols has served parishes in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina as an Episcopal priest for twenty-five years. While pursuing graduate studies in psychology and biblical studies in Berkeley in the 1980s, he began leading seminars for The Guild For Psychological Studies in San Francisco. After eight years as Director of The Educational Center in St. Louis, he moved to Charlotte where, until his retirement in 2001, he served as Minister of Adult Education at The Myers Park Baptist Church. Bill and Shirley now live in Alexandria, where they tutor public-school first graders, quilt and garden, paint and read. Bill continues to contribute to The Bible Workbench, which he created and edited for twenty years, and on occasion, he leads weekend retreats.



Jung on EvilOctober 21 through December 2
- Five Wednesdays

SOLD OUT

Book Exploration
Jung on Evil, Selected and Introduced by Murray Stein, part 2, April Barrett
7:30pm – 9:30 p.m., The Jung Society Library
Fees:
$50.00, member; $75.00, general

From the Back Matter:Well-known for his articulation of the "shadow side" of human individuality and culture, C.G. Jung wrote a great deal about the question of evil throughout his life and in scattered places in his work.

In this book his position is pieced together from many sources. In his early work on the unconscious, for instance, he considered the role of evil in the mental processes of the severely disturbed. Later, he viewed the question of moral choice within the framework of his ideas about archetypes and discussions about moral choices, conscience, and the continual ethical reflection that is necessary for all of us. The material here includes letters to Freud and Father Victor White and selections from his writings ranging from his Answer to Job to his travel piece on North Africa.

April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director, executive director, and secretary/treasurer of the board.



October 24 - Friday

An Evening With . . . Annilee Oppenheimer
IN THE EVENING OF LIFE: Living into Decline and Death, Annilee Oppenheimer
7:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $20.00, members in adv; $25.00, general, $15.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

The challenges of aging and dying can either reinforce outmoded habitual patterns that no longer serve us or they can motivate us to answer the true callings of our souls. This evening will be an exploration of how we can creatively engage with our own aging process in a way that prepares us for death, so that we experience death as the culmination of an ongoing process of individuation.

To assist us in this exploration, we will view a moving and powerful film about the inner life of a man as he coped with his terminal illness. In Appointment with the Wise Old Dog, David Blum, renowned symphony-orchestra conductor, was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 52. As he endured numerous medical procedures, Blum discovered that painting images from his dreams helped him move through his fear and despair as he confronted death. The dream images and their messages provided guidance to Blum, which ultimately enabled him to accept his mortality and to experience his journey toward death as a joyous and transcendent process.

Blum felt that the comfort and strength he gained from working with his dreams came from a supportive source beyond his individual ego, and he decided to share his experience with others so that they could become aware of this wise source within themselves. In spite of his weakening physical condition, Blum produced Appointment with the Wise Old Dog in the last months of his life to inspire others to connect with their inner resources to deal with debility, fragmentation, and death. Blum's example is an invitation for us to experience our own depths. After viewing it, we will engage in discussion about the implications this film may have for our own aging process.

Annilee Oppenheimer is a graduate of the Dream Leader training program of the Haden Institute; she leads dream circles.



October 25 - Saturday


Women's Discussion Group
Discussion on Flower Essences, Kyra Walsh
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $5.00, at the door

Discussion topic isTransforming the Second Half of Life: Introduction to Flower Essences and Guidance from the I Ching for women in their 50s and Beyond.

Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance and feel free to bring a friend.

Kyra Walsh is a flower essence & I Ching practitioner supporting people in transition and inner transformation work. She prepares individual essence blends addressing a wide range of health, behavioral, emotional, and relational issues for people and animals. Her company, The Cosmic Way: Healing~Learning~Co-creating also offers workshops and apprenticeships.



Sondra GellerNovember 6, 13, 20, December 4, 11 - Five Thursdays


Course
DREAM DRAWING REVISITED: Working with The Personal and the Collective Meaning of Our Dreams, Sondra Geller
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $125.00, members; $150.00, nonmembers; $100.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

This class is experiential and interactive. We combine the practice of Dream Drawing with conventional Jungian Dream Analysis using amplification and active imagination.  It has been found that adding drawing to dream work deepens the process and creates an opportunity to embody the experience.  Each participant will be asked to bring a personal dream to the group.  There will be time for each person to work with their dream.  Participants will learn how to translate dream images into simple drawings.  They will learn to listen to each other’s dreams intuitively focusing on the images evoked by the dream narrative.  They will learn to use the drawings to amplify the meaning of their dreams and will have the opportunity to understand how adding the expressive arts can deepen the experience of dream work.  Attention will be given to both the personal meaning of the dream imagery, as well as the collective.Having the drawings to reference enhances the process.  No previous experience with drawing is necessary.  The class size will be kept small, so early registration is recommended.

 

Sondra Geller, MA, ATR-BC, LPC is a Jungian Analyst, a Board Certified Art Therapist, and a Licensed Professional Counselor.  She is in private practice in Chevy Chase, Md.  She lectures and gives workshops for The George Washington University Art Therapy Master’s Program, Philadelphia Jung Institute/PAJA, the Jung Society of Washington, and the C.G. Jung Institute in Kusnacht, Switzerland.  Her focus is on Making Art in the Presence of the Analyst, Jung and Aging, Jung and the Creative Process, and Jungian Art Therapy.  Sandy was recently guest co-editor of a special issue of Psychological Perspectives, “Aging and Individuation,” and she presented a paper entitled “Sparking the Creative in Older Adults” at a Conference by the same name, sponsored by Psychological Perspectives and the Jung Institute of L.A.



Bonnie DamronNovember 7 - Friday


An Evening With . . . Bonnie Damron
THE ARCHETYPE OF THE WELL, Bonnie Damron
7:30 pm - 9:00 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $20.00, members in adv; $25.00, general, $15.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

There is a worldwide and enduring tradition of storytelling about the healing properties of fresh water, “the water of life,” water drawn from the sacred well of the Great Cosmic Mother.  Sagas say that these wells are places of initiation and healing, and hope.  Both women and men who served at and protected these wells, attended them.  Continuations of these legends tell how the wells of the Goddess were destroyed and their powers claimed by conquering kings and foreign gods.

This, however, is not where the story ends.  It is, in fact, part of the “Never-Ending Story,” the evolution of consciousness, dependent upon individual women and men who find meaning by searching for, finding, and opening the wells once more.

One story in particular, The Elucidation, helps us to apprehend the scope and multidimensional nature of the destruction and restoration of the wells.  This story continues today, as we move into the influence of the astrological sign of Aquarius, the Water Carrier.  Tonight we sit by the Sacred Well  and look into its depths to see what is there for each of us.

Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW, is a Jungian-Oriented psychotherapist in private practice in Northern Virginia. Dr. Damron is a clinician, cultural anthropologist, artist, and storyteller. She leads seminars in mythology, fairy tales, Shakespeare, the Greek Classics, and readings in the writings of C.G. Jung. She also leads contemplative retreats, and conducts study tours in Greece. Dr. Damron has a Masters of Social Work from Catholic University, a Doctorate Degree in American Studies from the University of Maryland, and a certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute in Brattleboro, Vermont.



Bonnie DamronNovember 7 - Friday


A Day With. . . Bonnie Damron
A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION ABOUT THE RESTORATION OF THE WELLS, Bonnie Damron
10:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $50.00, members in adv; $75.00, general, $40.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

The Elucidation, from the Grail Legend, tells how the Wasteland came into being when the shadow king, Amangons, and his knights destroyed Sovereignty's wells. Sovereignty, then, withdrew her Court of Joy from the land. It can be restored only when individual questers go in search of it. If the quester is fortunate enough to find it, then he or she must ask the right questions. Then joy will be restored to the land.

In today's language we call this quest the "individuation process," and the wells are Psyche's wells. As we enter the Aquarian Age, we note that its astrological symbol is a human being carrying a jar of water. It appears that, in the New Aion, Sovereignty, or God, or the Self, wants to relate to us as an individual human being who carries her or his portion of water drawn from the Great Well of the Cosmos. It says, "Look! Now I am a human being with a container able to carry and share the Water of Life, the Cup of Joy!"

Today each is offered an opportunity to individuate and to share in the restoration of the Wells. Each of us is now endowed with the possibility of bringing new forms of consciousness into being, and of carrying those psychic contents in new containers that are so needed today in our soul-starved world.

What kind of water is in your well, and what does your container look like? Please join us for a Round Table conversation about the status of our wells today. I will begin the discussion with a few ideas, and then open the floor for deep dialogue into this most important matter.

Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW, is a Jungian-Oriented psychotherapist in private practice in Northern Virginia. Dr. Damron is a clinician, cultural anthropologist, artist, and storyteller. She leads seminars in mythology, fairy tales, Shakespeare, the Greek Classics, and readings in the writings of C.G. Jung. She also leads contemplative retreats, and conducts study tours in Greece. Dr. Damron has a Masters of Social Work from Catholic University, a Doctorate Degree in American Studies from the University of Maryland, and a certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute in Brattleboro, Vermont.



James HollisNovember 14 - Friday

Lecture
WELCOMING JAMES HOLLIS: Personal Myth in Turbulent Times
7:30 pm -
The Embassy of Switzerland 2900 Cathedral Avenue, N.W.

Jung asked himself this question What is my myth? and realized that it was a question he could not answer.  Can we answer it?  In order to begin, we first have to understand what is meant by myth.  Then we need to consider what the question itself means.  Why we even have to ask this question is yet another question.  What is the cultural context in which we raise these questions?  How do our personal journeys intersect with the climate of our time?

James Hollis, Ph. D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C., and the executive director of the Jung Society of Washington.  He is the author of 14 books.

 


 


November 15 - Saturday


Women's Discussion Group
Discussion on the
The Black Madonna and the Connection to Mary Magdalene and France., Jane Petit-Moore
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, Jung Society Library
Fees: $5.00, at the door

Laura will lead a discussion of her latest book “Focused on the Spirit.”  

Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance and feel free to bring a friend.

Jane Petit-Moore is a retired Jungian psychotherapist with ongoing studies in fairy tales, the Tarot and legends. She has had psychotherapy practices in France and in Chicago where she treasures many friendships in the Jungian community.



November 21 - Friday

Film Night at the Embassy of Switzerland
Prendimi L'Anima (The Soul Keeper)
7:00 pm - Embassy of Switzerland
No fee for this event.

Directed by Roberto Faenza with strong performances by Emilia Fox (The Pianist), as Sabina Spielrein, and Iain Glen, as Carl Jung, this film is far superior to A Dangerous Method, telling a much fuller and more interesting story of both Spielrein (the primary subject) and the man through whose help she was restored to "normalcy."

Please join us for The Soul Keeper on Friday night, November 21, 7:00 p.m. (please note the time, as it varies from our usual 7:30 p.m. start time), at the Embassy of Switzerland, 2900 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20009. Please reserve your seat(s) below as seating is limited.



George CzuczkaDecember 5 - Friday

An Evening With . . .
DANTE, GOETHE, AND JOYCE; BEATRICE, GRETCHEN, AND MOLLY: The Long-Lasting Anima Triptych, George Czueczka
7:30 pm - 9:00 p.m., Jung Society Library
Fees: $20.00, members in adv; $25.00, general, $15.00,
full-time students and seniors over 65

[T]he animus likes to project himself upon "intellectuals" and all kinds of "heroes," including tenors, artists, sporting celebrities, etc. The anima has a predilection for anything that is unconscious, dark, equivocal, and unrelated in woman, and also her vanity, frigidity, helplessness, and so forth. – C.G. Jung, CW 16, par. 521

Are anima figures made in Heaven?
Are they down-to-earth?  
Has the cast of characters changed?
Does love still move the Sun and the other stars?

Dante, Goethe, Joyce. 
Beatrice, Gretchen, Molly:
the long-lasting anima triptych.
Where do we go from here?

George Czuczka is a retired Foreign Service Officer whose work and travels have taken him to Europe, Asia, and Africa and involved him in major international arms-control talks and nuclear negotiations. He is the author of Imprints of the Future – Politics and Individuation in Our Time, published by Daimon Verlag, Zurich, and Toward A Philosophy of Praxis, an annotated collection of social and ethical writings by John Paul II, published by Crossroad, New York. George is also a former member of our board of directors.


 

 

Events, Fall, 2013

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Announcement!

We have wonderful news

for the

Jung Society of Washington:

As of October 1, 2014,

Our new Executive Director

will be

JAMES HOLLIS, PH.D.

Welcome him on
Friday November 14


Institute for Sacred Activism

with
Andrew Harvey

Andrew Harvey

The economic, political, spiritual world crisis that we currently find ourselves in is a call to action. It is an opportunity for us to understand the realities around us and to rally together to do something different. We now have before us the possibility of using this current crisis to empower ourselves, and others, to actually get the planet to work. Embracing an uncertain future, we need to support leaders, who are inspired, courageous and effective to rise up. We need to renew the energy of people who are burnt out and apathetic in institutions and corporations. If we point individuals to an inner compass that renews their passion, there is hope for real solutions and inspired creativity. All that we need is already there, in the currency of people, and it only needs to be tapped into.
http://www.andrewharvey.net


Guild for
Psychological
Studies

For over fifty years, the Guild for Psychological Studies has conducted seminars that bring together the depth psychology of Carl Jung, the Records of the Life of Jesus (Synoptic Gospels), the Hebrew Scriptures, and material drawn from myth, poetry, world religions, and the evolving images of modern culture and science. Using a process based on Socratic inquiry and dialog, seminar participants carefully attend to images and feelings, discover connections between the personal and collective psyche, and often find a new commitment to the deep and unfolding truth that has been called the Self or Soul. Visit http://www.guildsf.org.


Joseph Cambray, PhD

Synchronicity: Nature and Psyche in an Interconnected Universe

Download pdf here

In 1952 C. G. Jung published a paradoxical hypothesis on synchronicity that marked an attempt to expand the western world’s conception of the relationship between nature and the psyche. Jung’s hypothesis sought to break down the polarizing cause-effect assessment of the world and psyche, suggesting that everything is interconnected. Thus, synchronicity is both "a meaningful event" and "an acausal connecting principle." Evaluating the world in this manner opened the door to "exploring the possibility of meaning in chance or random events, deciphering if and when meaning might be present even if outside conscious awareness."

Now, after contextualizing Jung’s work in relation to contemporary scientific advancements such as relativity and quantum theories, Joseph Cambray explores in this book how Jung’s theories, practices, and clinical methods influenced the current field of complexity theory, which works with a paradox similar to Jung’s synchronicity: the importance of symmetry as well as the need to break that symmetry for "emergence" to occur. Finally, Cambray provides his unique contribution to the field by attempting to trace "cultural synchronicities," a reconsideration of historical events in terms of their synchronistic aspects. For example, he examines the emergence of democracy in ancient Greece in order "to find a model of group decision making based on emergentist principles with a synchronistic core."

 


From frequent presenter,
Bud Harris:

We are happy to let you know that at the suggestion of people close to us we are going to enlarge our community. Our goal is to explore new ways to bring fresh and meaningful content to both old friends and new ones. As we continue our journey into our new community we will be exploring Jungian ideas, spirituality, my books, those I've co-authored with my wife, exercises from the workbook and seminars we have developed, exerts from lectures and the series I have done for several years at a local bookstore.

Our exploration will begin with my book SACRED SELFISHNESS. For those of you who have read and valued the book you will have the opportunity to find new ideas and a renewed sense of purpose in what we are presenting. And, you can now share the front matter and chapter one in the book with friends and family (download the free PDFs here.) After our initial opening we will continue every two weeks with the most compelling points in the next chapter and interesting exercises from the SACRED SELFISHNESS WORKBOOK. I will also be looking forward to sharing my new reflections that will come up as I look at this material again and hear from you.

There is, of course, a story behind why I am doing this. As I review my life I am very clear that my myth is to be a Jungian Analyst, a seeker and a healer. Part of this myth is to share what I have learned in a way that may help others in their efforts to find a self that is broader and stronger and a life that is beyond what they could have imagined. In other words I want to share in ways that may help you in your journey of individuation, finding your myth and living into the pattern of a fulfilled life that is inherent in every one of us. This is a journey to fulfill this pattern which is both instinctual and Divine, psychological and spiritual, and yet must also be lived fully.

Just as I am clear about my myth I am also clear the pattern for my life exists but I cannot know it in advance. Oh, how I often wish I could. But, my task from mid-life on has been to remove the blocks that separate me from it, seek to discover it and then live into it. And so, I've come full circle in the story behind this understanding. I want what I have learned and experienced, and what I can still learn and experience, to contribute to the river of life and not to someday simply disappear into the ground.

I would like to give a special invitation to those of you who have subscribed to my newsletter to join us in this new community. At the same time I will continue my newsletter approximately every other month. We will be sharing our new content through Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and a portal through the website of the Center for Spiritual Resources of the Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina.

I also want to give my sincere thanks to all of you for your interest in Jung, my work and for your responses and contributions.


In dreams, our complexes often appear in a personified form, and one can train oneself to such an extent that they become visible or audible also in a waking condition. . . . In the psychology of our unconscious, there are typical figures that have a definite life of their own.

-C.G. Jung,“Lecture Three,” The Tavistock Lectures, Analytical Psychology: Its Theory and Practice, p. 81



Presumably, we are dreaming all the time, although we are not aware of it by day because consciousness is much too clear. But at night, when there is that abaisement du niveau mental, the dreams can break through and become visible.

-C.G. Jung, “Lecture Three,” The Tavistock Lectures, Analytical Psychology: Its Theory and Practice, p. 87



I have noticed that dreams are as simple or as complicated as the dreamer is himself, only they are always a little bit ahead of the dreamer’s consciousness.

-C.G. Jung, “Lecture Four,” The Tavistock Lectures, Analytical Psychology: Its Theory and Practice, p. 122



[I]t is not safe to interpret a dream without going into careful detail as to the context. . . . [A]lways ask the [dreamer] how he feels about his dream images. For dreams are always about a particular problem of the individual about which he has a wrong conscious judgment. . . . 

Dreams are the natural reaction of the self-regulating psychic system.

-C.G. Jung, “Lecture Four,” The Tavistock Lectures, Analytical Psychology: Its Theory and Practice, p. 123-4



M]ythological or collective dreams have a character that forces people instinctively to tell them. This instinct is quite appropriate because such dreams do not belong to the individual; they have a collective meaning.

-C.G. Jung, “Lecture Four,” The Tavistock Lectures, Analytical Psychology: Its Theory and Practice, p. 125

 
   

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